Should the EU admit Turkey?

Sat, May 16 2009 03:29pm BST 1
Paul Judge
Paul Judge
26 Posts
For a long time now the EU has been considering admitting Turkey. Is Turkey ready? What would the EU gain from this? Would Turkish membership alter the identity of the EU too much?
Tue, May 19 2009 04:54am BST 2
Jeremy  Spencer
Jeremy Spencer
1 Posts
Once I was in favour of Turkey joining the EU - but no longer.
Tue, May 19 2009 09:33pm BST 3
Graham Burton
Graham Burton
16 Posts

i think they should be omit in to the eu but not at the moment they need to clean up their issues first but if they do not it may have a dangerous effect on other muslin countries if the eu does not allow them in but not currently.

if when they have clean up their acts than yes as it may show the other muslin countries their is some good work that can come out of join the eu and bring harmoney across the world.

Mon, May 25 2009 08:26am BST 4
Ahmed Khan
Ahmed Khan
1 Posts
What's made you change your mind Jeremy?
Mon, May 25 2009 09:44pm BST 5
Lucy O'Sullivan McCormick
Lucy O'Sullivan McCormick
7 Posts
Turkish friends and others I have met tell me that Turkey is two countries: the European facing west which is forward looking and ready to enter the EU and the backward looking, Conservative, Asian facing, east which is economically and politically less advanced. What do we do? Wait twenty years for the east to start to catch up or let the whole shebang in now? You tell me. My gut feeling is that it would be better to have Turkey with us than without, but the main problem is the size of its population ...71.5 million and rising...so it would effectively be the second most populated country in Europe after Germany. And Reza could tell us more about Turkey and energy......
Fri, Jun 5 2009 08:25pm BST 6
Hugh McCreedy
Hugh McCreedy
2 Posts
Rather depends on how you define Europe. In its current manisfestation, I would let no other countries in. The bigger Europe gets the larger the waste, corruption and pointless legislation. If we were to ever return to the original concept of an economic rather that political community, then I would say yes to Turkey and quite a few others.
Sat, Jul 25 2009 12:34pm BST 7
Lyn Tofari
Lyn Tofari
12 Posts

A very tricky issue as I know very many Greek Cypriots, being married to one, also having spent many a long summer there to introduce my sons to their non English heritage.

In conversations the feeling for the Turks has either been indifference or emphatically negative. Surprisingly a lot of negative fedback I have had has been from Turkish Cypriots. They refer to the 'mainland' Turks as 'the Anatolians'.

Cyprus still has much of it's 'village' mentality, which is charming, and while Greeks and Turks had their own villages, there were a number of villages, where they lived side by side. 

On one trip I was talking to an 'American Greek Cypriot', his father had set up home and had a family in the USA. The family still retained their family home in a mountain village and visited regularly. On one such visit the son asked an elderly neighbour how she was. She told him that she wasn't very happy as 'foreigners' had moved in next door. When speaking to the 'foreigners' he discovered that they were from Nicosia and had never left the shores of Cyprus!

So until the situation is remedied to the satifaction of both the Turkish and the Greek Cypriots, then I must say 'no' to Turkeys' entry into the EU.

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